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435 Replies

@9G4NJKBSocialist from New York answered…2yrs

No, this is an unconstitutional invasion of privacy, not to mention the potential racism and sexism that could result from this.

@9TT2TRLLibertarian from Texas answered…1yr

No, only with a warrant showing probable cause of criminal activity and abolish the NSA fbi Cia ntf open area 51

@9TPB9HVRepublican from Texas answered…1yr

No, only with a warrant showing probable cause of criminal activity and abolish the NSA fbi ntf Cia and open area 51

@9TL8JYCLibertarian from Texas answered…1yr

No, only with a warrant showing probable cause of criminal activity and abolish the NSA fbi ntf cia ice and open area 51

@9SZ5JCVWomen’s Equality from Missouri answered…1yr

@9SVHCFWWomen’s Equality from Virginia answered…1yr

@9QGPDXBGreen from Washington answered…2yrs

They need to be regulated regarding "rubber stamp" warrants and have transparency and notice that is required in normal criminal cases.

@9QBTWPZDemocrat from Florida answered…2yrs

Yes because it is useful for many different issues and doesn't really have a downside

@9PMK8YXVeteran from Nebraska answered…2yrs

@9NSJFGJWomen’s Equality from California answered…2yrs

@9NBQ7R5Women’s Equality from Minnesota answered…2yrs

@9N7BC8TWomen’s Equality from New York answered…2yrs

only if the NSA has valid information that indicates the subject is in fact a suspected terrorist. It should be closely monitored so that innocent citizens' privacy & rights are not trampled upon.

@9N39JHMRepublican from New Jersey answered…2yrs

No, only with a warrant showing probable cause of criminal activity, or consent.

@9MMZ2BVSocialist from California answered…2yrs

No but they should be able to request that information from service providers with a warrant or probable cause.

@9MLX359Democrat from Connecticut answered…2yrs

@9MCTKQGDemocrat from Kansas answered…2yrs

@9LYBBN3Democrat from Michigan answered…2yrs

@popemdWomen’s Equality from Tennessee answered…2yrs

Yes, when given probable cause or a warrant for suspected criminal activity.

@Jason-KolLibertarian from Utah answered…2yrs

Yes, as long as these tactics are effective in stopping suspect terrorists

@9L4ZM63Women’s Equality from South Carolina answered…2yrs

No, because now this seems as if it's an invasion of privacy. Only do this if it's necessary, only to track criminals.

@9KP3GFSGreen from Tennessee answered…2yrs

@9K3WN98Women’s Equality from New Jersey answered…2yrs

@9JVX4LYConstitution from North Carolina answered…2yrs

it depends, if there are credible threats to the safety of the public but don't take data from everyone wholesale

@9HRTGQ4Republican from Nevada answered…2yrs

This should be case by case. If it’s something simple, no. If it’s for national security, it can in no way lead to an arrest for something not pertaining to the initial arrest warrant.

@9HN3PRTVeteran from Kansas answered…2yrs

The NSA only does this for those suspected of terrorism and not every day citizens

@9HLTVWBWorking Familyfrom Guam  answered…2yrs

No, only with a warrant showing probable cause of criminal or treasonous activity

@9HGRRGZTranshumanist from Virginia answered…2yrs

@9HDBZD9Republican from Connecticut answered…2yrs

@9HC739ZPeace and Freedom from Nevada answered…2yrs

@9H2D6LVWomen’s Equality from North Carolina answered…2yrs

I feel that I do not know enough about this topic to contribute an answer.

@9GZF7XWConstitution from Pennsylvania answered…2yrs

Only if there is legitimate evidence that would give reason to collect basic metadata.

@9GTRL4TWorking Family from Ohio answered…2yrs

only if they are being investigated because of terrorist activities

@9GQPC2MRepublican from New Jersey answered…2yrs

I don't think they should be looking at citizens, but people from abroad here on Visas, etc.

@9GLWBKMIndependent from Kansas answered…2yrs

Yes, but not the conversation unless a landline at a prison, courthouse, capital, etc.

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