Try the political quiz

1,238 Replies

@9VQQVQ9Socialist from Ohio answered…10mos

Yes if you do not vaccinate you have to bear the consequences.

@9TY7FB7Socialist from California answered…1yr

Yes, in places with low positivity rates and offer a choice between online and in-person learning.

@9TKW843Women’s Equality from Washington answered…1yr

Yes, once children can be vaccinated. Then, only vaccinated children should be allowed to attend an online learning should continue to be offered.

@Carole-GilleyPeace and Freedom from Georgia answered…1yr

Not yet, because of the risk it carries to not only children, but also teachers, administrators, and other staff.

@9SPSN93Green from Idaho answered…1yr

Yes, but schools should strictly enforce COVID prevention guidelines and educate their necessity

@9RS4LXQGreen from California answered…1yr

Yes, but only if the vaccine is released in America and widely effective.

@Giacomo-PendolaDemocrat from Texas answered…1yr

yes, but you should have an option between online and in-person

@9RS33KPWomen’s Equality from South Carolina answered…1yr

It depends on the amount of cases in that area. It should also be a choice for a child to be virtual if they wish.

@9RRW9S8Veteran from Louisiana answered…1yr

@9RRW49CDemocrat from Texas answered…1yr

Only if infection rate, hospitalizations, and deaths fall dramatically.

@9RRVVQYVeteran from Louisiana answered…1yr

Only if Covid-19 cases have gone down and the risk of being sick is less likely.

@9RRTXKBDemocrat from New York answered…1yr

If the school find a safe way to separate students. Students need to come back to school full time.

@9RRTSXMWomen’s Equality from North Carolina answered…1yr

@9RRTQLVIndependent from North Carolina answered…1yr

It should be determined when the time comes and decide due to how COVID 19 is still affecting the world or region.

@brooke-MWomen’s Equality from Texas answered…1yr

If the global pandemic calms down, then yes. If it is still as bad then no, there needs to be some form of change.

@9RRSBR5Democrat from Virginia answered…1yr

@9RRRYTSWorking Family from Kansas answered…1yr

Yes and no, it depends on the area, number of cases, and what the students parents want for their child's safety.

@9RRRPXPDemocrat from Maine answered…1yr

If Covid-19 doesn't end up dying down significantly then they shouldn't.

@9RRQR59Democrat from Maryland answered…1yr

Decision should be made this spring. We don’t know enough yet!

@9RRJY6GDemocrat from Georgia answered…1yr

If the covid vaccine has been administered to all people and we are not at high risk

@9RRJKTBGreen from Georgia answered…1yr

only if everyone is vaccinated and corona has been dealt with properly.

@9RRJD4NWomen’s Equality from Iowa answered…1yr

Yes if it is safe and 80% of staff and student have been vaccinated for COVID 19. Online should still be offered for those who have compromised immune systems.

@9RRJ2VVSocialist from Georgia answered…1yr

Different types of schools(University vs. Elementary) should have different regulations .Depending on the rollout of a widespread vaccine program this will ideally be possible in the fall, but if students and teachers are not properly vaccinated I believe in person schooling should be limited

@9RRHQ9VGreen from Louisiana answered…1yr

It depends on the COVID-19 situation. Possibly still a hybrid of online and in person

@9RRHNPRWomen’s Equality from Georgia answered…1yr

Yes, but only after it is confirmed that people of higher risk will have either been vacinated or protected.

@9RRG9CQPeace and Freedom from Georgia answered…1yr

no, unless vaccines are present in all students and faculty that attend, and the virus has no way of spreading

@9RRFQPCDemocrat from California answered…1yr

@9RRFF7QWomen’s Equality from Georgia answered…1yr

Yes, if there no big threat to everyone's health and the vaccine is effective

@9RRF8M6Democrat from Michigan answered…1yr

@9RRCWG2Peace and Freedom from Michigan answered…1yr

Yes as long as appropriate safety measures have been implemented and BOTH local health agencies AND local governments give the okay.

@9RRCTTDWomen’s Equality from Georgia answered…1yr

Yes, but parents should still be given the option of online learning or in-person learning.

@9V2VR53Democrat from Illinois answered…12mos

Yes but only with appropriate precautions in place to protect against COVID, and there still needs to be a remote option for those who have medical reasons (i.e., unable to get vaccinated due to health condition, student or family member who is high-risk for severe COVID).

@FLEXWKURepublican from Kentucky answered…1yr

Yes, based on local school district, and still have option of virtual and in-person learning.

@9T7B623Women’s Equality from Missouri answered…1yr

@9T6Z785American Solidarity from Georgia answered…1yr

No, but allow students who want to learn in-person to attend in-person

@9T5L346Women’s Equality from Wisconsin answered…1yr

I believe kids should be able to do years k-12 either online or in person regardless of civid. Or be able to chose a blend. Every kid is different, so why should their education style be a "one size fits all" deal?

@9T33VK4Green from Washington answered…1yr

Yes, but mostly for younger grades where in person teaching is more crucial for a child's educational foundation; it is unnecessary at this time for schools to be re-opened for most older students, where they are reasonably and reliable able to complete their work online or at home

@9SZMM2VDemocrat from South Carolina answered…1yr

@9SZDFL4Peace and Freedom from Washington answered…1yr

No, not until every person living in the U.S. is vaccinated.

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